Psychics in Movies VS Psychics in Real Life

Updated: Aug 25

I am just dying to address this.


There are so many misconceptions about psychics that stem from their portrayal in the media, and I'm here to clear them up.


Let's hop right in.

If you've never interacted with real psychics such as mediums and tarot readers, there's a good chance you have a preconceived notion of who they are and how they behave.


Most movies (such as "What Men Want") portray them as some sort of voodoo-loving, long-nailed, traditional gypsy-dressed woman who uses a crystal ball and speaks in riddles. She talks to her clients in her boho-decorated room full of potions and knick-knacks, and poofs away after a few sentences, never to be found again.


And this portrayal is very, very, inaccurate.


First of all, no two psychics are the same. The same way no two ballerinas, metalheads, scientists, or surfers are the same. We love to automatically plop people into categories when we learn their profession or interests, but in reality, everyone is a unique blend of talents, interests, skills, mannerisms, and life experiences.


So the idea that you can tell if someone is a psychic just by looking at them is utterly false.


In fact, many psychics, intuitives, tarot readers-whatever you wanna call them, are super regular people.


That's right-plenty of people that walk by you on the daily are intuitives, tarot readers, mediums, and healers; and just like all other aspects of a person, you wouldn’t be able to tell just by looking at them.


While it is true that some psychics like to dress like gypsies or witches, use crystal balls, and have a reading space decorated like the ones you see in the movies, many psychics have a regular job, work as a psychic on the side, and have no desire to wear any sort of bohemian style clothing.


As a matter of fact, many psychics like to keep their psychic abilities on the down-low because they're too scared to come out of the closet, or just wish to avoid dealing with the prejudice that would come their way from the skeptics.


Just like other stigmatized groups of people, like emos, goths, and hippies, many of us are scared of being judged, bullied, and called crazy. So for a lot of us, it's just easier to keep our abilities fairly concealed.


Unfortunately, there are a handful of people who are fakes, or charge too much money for their poorly developed skills-that ruin it for the rest of us. Add that on top of the way psychics are portrayed in movies, and you have a recipe for being misunderstood and picked on.


On a side note, I have found that most psychics that operate in store-fronts using neon signs to entice people to come in tend to be the scammers. It's like they're overcompensating for the fact that they're not actually psychic, and try to prey on the people that have no idea about real psychics.


Anyways, another misconception that's portrayed in the movies is that psychics need tarot cards and crystal balls to perform their readings.


Psychics can actually perform readings using a multitude of objects, such as candle wax, charms, pendulums boards, or even no objects at all. This is because the reader picks up on the energies and just uses the objects as an aid.


What's more, psychics don't even have to be with their client in person to perform a reading-the way they always are in the movies.


Thanks to modern technology, many psychics offer readings via telephone, video-call, email, or even send you a pre-recorded YouTube video. The readings done through technology are no less accurate than the in-person ones, although lots of people still like to get them done in person anyways.


That's all for the misconceptions for now; I hope this article has cleared up any confusion you may have had.


If you're interested in understanding a bit more about how psychics work and how to make sure you've found a good one, I suggest reading my article, How to Know You’re Being Ripped Off by a Psychic.


That's all for now; hope you have a wonderful week.



Take care,



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